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How To Choose the Right Colour Scheme

When you step into the house, you don’t have to make astute observations to get the general feel of the house. One of the first few things that you’re going to take notice of are the colors of the walls, because they contribute to the overall ambience, thus ultimately playing an integral role in how you will feel everyday. Is the place merely a place where you live in? Or can your house be some place where you can call home? With that said, it is important to realize that choosing the right colors for your walls isn’t a step that you should overlook or rush through. Here are some tips on how to ensure that you pick out the exact colors to suit your home.

Ask Yourself Questions
In order to decide which color scheme would be best suited for your house, you need to ask yourself different sorts of questions. Which room are you going to paint? Who will be using the room? Is it a private space or community pace? How do you want it to feel? If you want to repaint your walls, what is the current color in the house and how does that make you feel? What is the style of furniture? How much natural light does the room receive? These are just several questions that you can ask yourself before you discuss about the choices available with your contractor to save time.

Understand What Color Is About
By definition, color is an element of art that is produced when light is reflected back to the eye after striking an object. Everyone’s perception of color differs, thus, it’s important to consider several important components before choosing the right color scheme. It also depends on how you want your home to look like. For example, painting a small house in dark colors or darker shades will make it look smaller. However, by painting it in a lighter color or lighter shade, the house will seem brighter.

Hues Are Important Too
Even though the common generalizations apply – red as energizing, blue as soothing and green as relaxing, it actually only is true for certain hues. For example, the wrong shade of red might make you feel suffocated instead of feeling invigorated. An electric green wouldn’t make you feel at ease and a greenish blue might make you feel cold instead. Be sure to consult well with your painting contractor to pick out the color scheme that will make you feel most comfortable. After all, this is the place you are going to be living in everyday!

Harmonize Color With Surroundings
If you live in landed property and have a backyard or wonderful scenery, you could try harmonizing the colors of your exterior or interior walls with the landscape. Also, remember about your roof! The general guide is that your roof should always be a neutral shade that can be flexible to its surroundings (siding, trim, etc.) To mesh the color of your house with the colors around it requires some knowledge on color theory, which refers to the complex study that centers on how colors correlate with one another.

Don’t Scrimp on Details
Depending on the style of your home, you might want to highlight certain details. You might want to paint your doors and feature the trim. If you live in a double-story house, you might want to paint a darker color for the ground floor and a lighter color for the second floor. Small details like these matter – be creative! However, be careful when it comes to contrast and be sure not to overdo it.

Your home should be a reflection of yourself or your family, and a canvas for you to (literally) paint on! With the right colors, you can not only improve the overall mood of the household, but also enhance feelings of health and well-being. For those moving into a new home, remember to choose the right color scheme! And for those thinking of repainting their walls, it’s never too late to contact a trusted painting company.

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